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In the News

Fourth Quarter 2015

03
DEC

aWhere and Global Weather Corporation Partner to Provide Growers with Premium Field-Level Weather Intelligence

aWhere and Global Weather Corporation Partner to Provide Growers with Premium Field-Level Weather Intelligence New York Times Opinion Page: A New Dark Age Looms


Boulder, Colorado – Dec. 2, 2015 – aWhere™ and Global Weather Corporation® (GWC) have partnered to provide premium weather intelligence to agribusiness. The benefit to aWhere customers is improved visibility into field-level agricultural intelligence. This premium service can improve growth stage estimates by as much as 2.7 days over climatology and 0.7 days over National Weather Service forecasts.

“To provide our customers with the highest possible accuracy, aWhere always selects and blends the best weather data sources; we never rely on just one source. By partnering with GWC, we’re able to offer the world’s most accurate weather forecast to growers,” says John Corbett, CEO and founder of aWhere. “For example, by blending GWC’s field-level forecast accuracy with aWhere’s observed weather data and agronomic models, commercial vegetable growers will predict harvest dates and daily production with more certainty.”

The addition of GWC’s forecast accuracy reduces growth stage uncertainty by 20% or more. Growers can gain better pricing and lower their operational costs through improved labor scheduling and reduced over-planting.

Accurately monitoring crop growth stage is critical for field-level operational decisions. The actual length of a growth stage corresponds to a certain number of growing degree-days, also known as growing degree units, or GDU. For corn, a typical day during the growing season represents 20 GDU, which can vary greatly. Integrating the accuracy of GWC forecasts can improve the uncertainty in each growth stage estimate by 2.7 days over historical climatology and 0.7 days over the U.S. National Weather Service Global Forecast System (GFS).

“Similar to a human meteorologist, yet with 24/7 global scale coverage, our technology learns local conditions by monitoring weather stations throughout the world and applies machine intelligence to constantly improve our forecast,” explains Dr. William Gail, GWC CTO and 2014 American Meteorological Society President. “Combined with our continued investment in research and development and our persistent focus on automation, this capability allows us to provide the most accurate forecast anywhere in the world.”

About aWhere:
Founded in 1999, aWhere collects and analyzes over a billion points of data from around the globe each day to create unprecedented visibility and insight known as Agricultural Intelligence, critical to decision making from farm level through to national policy. For more information, visit www.awhere.comwww.awhere.com.

About Global Weather Corporation:
To serve a world connected by information, Global Weather Corporation® (GWC) is transforming how weather forecasts are created, delivered, and used. GWC’s artificial intelligence systems process the world’s best weather data into forecasts that have been independently validated as the most accurate available anywhere (by ForecastWatch, www.bit.ly/1HHncFd). Our customers are large and small companies; we improve how they serve their customers, and make their operations more effective. For further information, visit www.globalweathercorp.com.

Media Contacts:
aWhere
Morag Greenberg
moraggreenberg@awhere.com

Global Weather Corporation
Mark Flolid
mflolid@globalweathercorp.com

01
DEC

USA Today Op-Ed, by GWC CTO Bill Gail: Don't Let Climate Change Hinder the Economy

USA Today Op-Ed, by GWC CTO Bill Gail: Don't Let Climate Change Hinder the Economy

USA Today Op-Ed, by GWC CTO Bill Gail: Don't Let Climate Change Hinder the Economy

Nature’s deviations disrupt our lives and businesses more than we should accept.

Super hurricanes, mega droughts and 1,000-year floods have made big news in the months leading to this week’s climate talks in Paris. Everyone wants to know how global warming has contributed and whether we should prepare for a future of weather on steroids. The science community races to provide clear answers.

Yet we need not wait for additional science, or resolve contentious policy debates, to recognize one simple truth. Natural climate variability itself — even absent human influence — disrupts our lives and businesses to a far greater extent than we should accept. Research suggests that the U.S. economy suffers half a trillion dollars or more in lost growth annually due to unforeseen climate variations: unseasonal cold spells, prolonged drought, unusually stormy months and much more.

To be clear, this column is not about human influence. Plenty has been published on that divisive topic, within these pages and elsewhere. This is a story about nature’s own climate uncertainties, and the economic consequences of not understanding them better. We — on every side of the climate debate — are holding our economy back. We have allowed disagreement over human influence to push aside what should be a non-controversial goal: improving our understanding of nature itself. Congress has even threatened to slash what research we already do. We must fix that.

Why should Congress — or any of us — care about natural climate variability? Because it creates enormous inefficiencies in our economy. A 2011 report by economist Jeffrey Lazo and colleagues in the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society showed that on a state-by-state basis, annual variability in U.S. economic output due to climate-related supply and demand inefficiencies averages more than 3%. In states such as California, Ohio and New York, it is more than 10%. Shocking! And that doesn’t even include the high costs of catastrophic weather events, such as the 2012 Superstorm Sandy’s $65 billion tab that almost equaled New York City’s budget.

The causes of this variability are no mystery. Unexpectedly low or high seasonal temperatures routinely lead to higher energy prices. Drought, such as that plaguing the Southwest, places enormous economic pressure on farmers. Abnormal spring flooding in one place or another disrupts businesses each year. We all understand this. Deviations from normal climate were cited by The Wall Street Journal as a major cause for the gross domestic product drop of 2.9% in the first quarter of 2014. Can nature really push around our nation’s great economic engine so easily?

We don’t have to accept this. A significant portion of this inefficiency can be recovered as economic growth through better information technology. Doing so would be a huge boost to the nation’s welfare. Improving our ability to anticipate climate fluctuations provides one lever to grow the economy faster — an elusive goal these days.

None of this stops at U.S. borders. If the impact of climate variability on the U.S. economy is large, the global impact is far larger. In a connected world, increasingly dependent on global trade, climate matters — even far beyond where it is happening. Anything we learn that reduces our vulnerability in the U.S. can be leveraged to grow international business opportunities as well.

Businesses must anticipate climate at multiple time scales. Retailers plan inventory for weather-sensitive consumers months in advance. Being wrong is costly. Farmers decide a season or more ahead which crops to plant and how tight water resources might be. Food prices often soar when farmers are incorrect. Companies must anticipate climate decades in advance when planning infrastructure. Those throughout the Southwest, for example, need to know how soon the drought will end and when it will re-occur.

Improving the information that helps us anticipate, adapt to and price in nature’s variability would seem a wise, non-partisan goal. Much of what we need originates in basic research, funded by government agencies such as NASA, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the U.S.Geological Survey and the National Science Foundation. The challenges are large: understand Earth in all its complexity, including the interactions among atmosphere, ocean and lands. We have learned from the difficulty of predicting specific phenomena such as El Nino just how much new science this takes. Succeeding requires ongoing commitment.

Yet this commitment is at risk. In the complex process of creating the 2016 budget, Congress has threatened to cut NASA Earth science funding by 18% to 32%. Some say this is because these agencies research both natural and human-caused climate variability. We may choose to debate the policy response to human influence, but we should not let it hamper other business needs. Improving our ability to predict natural climate is too important to accept this sort of political fallout.

Working to understand natural climate variability is a no-brainer. This variability imposes a 3% economic tax we can help eliminate. The business community gets it. Let’s enable our businesses to outsmart climate variability, not make them collateral damage from the climate debate. It is too important to our economic growth.

10
NOV

Weather Tools Enhances Precision Weather Forecast for California Agriculture with Global Weather Corporation

Weather Tools Enhances Precision Weather Forecast for California Agriculture with Global Weather Corporation


Boulder, Colo., Nov. 10, 2015 – Weather Tools and Global Weather Corporation (GWC) have partnered to lead the delivery of precision forecasting for the California agriculture industry. Leveraging the framework of Weather Tools’ innovative two-year old Growers Weather Network (GroWN), the partnership now delivers weather intelligence to California growers down to the field level. The foundation of GroWN is a proprietary system of weather observation sites, created and maintained specifically for California agriculture, with the Central Valley as its initial focus.

GWC accesses data from the GroWN sites and computes field-specific weather forecasts. These are delivered electronically to Weather Tools, which then provides growers with accurate on-demand mobile weather-based intelligence, hourly out to 15 days. With GroWN, growers have year-around support for optimal crop management decision making.

“We rely on GWC services to ensure that we are providing the best forecast information to growers,” said Rob Doornbos, Weather Tools Owner and Principal. “In large part, our forecast success is attributable to the accuracy of GWC’s products and services. GWC forecasts provide a level of temporal and spatial accuracy that is unsurpassed in the industry and a must-have for growers. Integrating GWC’s forecasts into GroWN allows us to change the way weather services are utilized, empowering more informed and confident decision making for farmers than ever before. We are building consistently accurate local weather intelligence, which is critically important in an environment where operating margins are pulling in, due to a wide variety of factors.”

Customers agree. “Weather Tools has been very helpful for our company. The Weather Tools’ GroWN ‘Daily Weather Discussion’ helps us plan our day and we have found the service to be accurate. Plus, we can look at the real-time weather throughout the valley, via their mobile app, which helps us decide whether we can fly an application in that area or not. We are very satisfied with Weather Tools,” said Alex Compton, Field Representative for Avag, Inc., an agricultural aviator based in Richvale, California.

“Our partner Weather Tools provides a perfect example of how agricultural weather forecasting can be improved by deploying high quality weather stations whose data are readily integrated into GWC forecasts. Similar to a human meteorologist, our technology learns about local conditions, biases and tendencies by monitoring weather stations and then applies machine intelligence to constantly improve our forecast. Combined with our continued investment in research and development and our persistent focus on automation, this capability allows us to provide the most accurate forecast – anywhere in the world. This accuracy has been verified by third-party analysis from ForecastWatch for both 2013 and 2014,” stated Mark Flolid, GWC Chief Executive Officer.

About Weather Tools:
GroWN is an innovative, mobile-first, precision weather application developed to support California agriculture. Industry-leading forecast and management support modules have been developed using the data available from the Weather Tools Observation Network. The service provides California growers with reliable and robust field-level data that may be used to create an optimal response to anticipated changes in the weather and/or climate. For more information, see www.weathertools.org.

About Global Weather Corporation:
To serve a world connected by information, Global Weather Corporation® (GWC) is transforming how weather forecasts are created, delivered, and used. GWC’s artificial intelligence systems process the world’s best weather data into forecasts that have been independently validated as the most accurate available anywhere (by ForecastWatch, www.bit.ly/1HHncFd). Our customers are large and small companies; we improve how they serve their customers, and make their operations more effective. For further information, visit www.globalweathercorp.com.

News Media Contacts:
Weather Tools
Rob Doornbos
Owner/Principal
rob@weathertools.org

Global Weather Corporation
Mark Flolid
CEO
mflolid@globalweathercorp.com

Phone

303-592-2061

Office Address

3005 Sterling Circle, Suite 201
Boulder, CO 80301